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20131101
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WETA 29
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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
WETA
Nov 1, 2013 6:00pm EDT
wanted men. gunmen opening fire at los angeles national airport, killing a security agent and winning several others. and first moscow, now berlin, former american contractor edward snowden says he will help a u.s. -- a german investigation into u.s. surveillance programs. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. a high-ranking taliban official says the leader of the taliban and pakistan has been killed in a u.s. drone strike. the missiles are said to have targeted his house and his car in the north, as a meeting was underway. others, including his brother, are also reported to have died in the attack. richard galpin is following developments from islamabad. i spoke with him just a short time ago. richard, what has been the reactions to the death? >> certainly amongst politicians here in islamabad, particularly the opposition, there has been real dismay about what has happened. some of them describing it as a deliberate attempt by the united states to try to sabotage the hopes of some kind of talks taking place between the pakistan g
WETA
Nov 2, 2013 6:00pm EDT
is >>> on this edition for saturday november 2nd, following yesterday's shooting in los angeles, eem examine what it will take to secure the nations airports. >>> in our signature segment assuming generic drugs mean inexpensive, could cost you big time. >> the gentleman looked it up, a price of around $400 after he looked it up. i said to him, can't be. you must be looking at the brand name drug. it can't be that expensive. >>> and the global gender gap. where the u.s. ranks. >> the u.s. doesn't fare very well compared to the very rich countries, and in some countries, many poorer countries do better than we do. >>> next on "pbs newshour weekend." >>> "pbs newshour weekend" is made possible by -- . >>> that's why we are your retirement company. additional support is provided by -- and by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. from the tisch studios at lincoln center in new york, hari sreenivasan. >> good evening, thanks for joining us. new cancellations at los angeles international airport day after the fata
WETA
Nov 9, 2013 1:00am EST
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with graham nash and two-time rock 'n .oll hall of fame inductee of theicipated in some most legendary excesses and has now written about those callednces in a new book "wild tales." we are glad you have joined us. a conversation with graham nash coming up right now. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. cofounder of crosby stills and nash, graham nash has been at the forefront of rock music. he has written a few more experiences, good and bad. quick reminder of how great those harmonies are. singinga clip of them "wooden ships." ♪ ♪ tavis: i guess one would expect a book written by a rock 'n roll star to have the obligatory chapters about sex and drugs. to be sure, that exists in the book. i expect in conversations that get to that.y will i will leave it to the other show host to dig that up. i don't know if we have the front and the back cover. contemporary graham nash. there is a fascinating and heartbreaking story in this book about how you got introduce
WETA
Nov 6, 2013 12:00am EST
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight a conversation with grammy award-winning singer al jarreau. he has used his exceptional ground. find common we are glad you joined us. a conversation with al jarreau coming up. ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. hiss: al jarreau earned first grammy. he stays on to her. -- on tour. you are never in town long enough for a conversation. debuted, al jarreau was our guest on the first night. it is all because of you that i am here. have nothing to going on. i just love talking to you. >> i just mentioned tavis is a friend of al jarreau. tavis: i want to hear some al jarreau. let's take a clip of al jarreau on to her. -- on tour. ♪ [portuguese singing] i still don't know if have it, but you've still got it. >> you definitely have it. you, tavissaying to for president. wish it uponif i you these days. trying to shut the government down, i don't want no part in that. you are always on the road. you are always in some strange part of the world. you're not tired of all this traveling? >> that part of everyday. everyday is thanks giving for me. i still have an audience, and they asked the local promoter, when is al coming back? i don't know what i would do anyway. tavis: how have you protected this instrument? >> i am closer to a baritone bass been trying to scream with those tender voices. i pushed my voice. i always try to stay fit. day, trying every to stay fit. to have too many bad habits. >> i went down on my knees in prayer, and i hated that you were so far from me i could not get you. i could not reach out to touch you, but i was rating for you. like tom a don't let that happen. like, don't let that happen. valves that were leaking, but i had not noticed anything until then. a couple of instances of but that of rest, really set me down for a few minutes. was in thelater i studio, and eight days later i was on stage. i'm not stopping. i asked this question because i am curious about when and where you came into the knowledge that this was your going gift, that you were to spend your life empowering .nd inspiring >> i sat next to my mother in church. happened before i set foot on this planet. -- aour brilliant pn brilliant pianist. i came here with something i inherited from my folks. you can call me out went. .- call me al got people interested in the story that includes an orchestra. i can't say a lot more about it, but we are going to tell the story about what happened. i was six or seven and singing. people smiled and pinched my cheeks until the blood vessels broke. i knew i was doing something right. i did a concert at five years in the garden. we raise money to buy a new pn iano at our church in milwaukee. i kind of knew something was going on. brothers were singing. i started singing. i didn't know i wasn't supposed to sing intervals like that. there it was right in front of me. it would later become part of my signature. just like our thumbprint makes us different from anyone in the world, you said we have a .humbprint on our throat your voice is distinctive in the world, and you have to give some volume to your voice. that was the most deeply philosophical thing i have heard. anyone who hears your voice in the middle of the night knows that is tavis smiley. they would know your voice .ecause of the textures >> you discovered this when you were five years old, but how did you become proficient. did you become so versatile in so many different genres? >> it's all listening and exposure. that's why it's so important to expose your kids do many different things. i can sing some poll codes. don't get me started. lkas.me po don't get me started. i'm proud of that. i watched elvis restfully become. -- elvis presley become. become.d chuck berry i listened to doo-wop before it was called doo-wop. ♪ i did that in the airport. we took victors and started singing in an international airport. photos and started singing in an international airport. >> you were singing a cappella? >> our families go back to this little school in huntsville, alabama. they saying in a quartet. amazing, and that gets mentioned on stage. every day is thanksgiving. you're going to hear god. tavis: you're a class act. >> the thing is we need to keep some voices that hold some stuff. there are other voices making a bazillion dollars, and kids are listening. tavis: you mentioned take six. it was one of the great joys of your life where you were a kid growing up in milwaukee and to now have artist's as they break. times where people say he sounds like al jarreau. i remember kim, they said, he .ounds like al jarreau i assume it must be a huge that they compare them. you there is arn lot of money to be made. you don't want to be al jarreau. >> i do this for free and did it stillee a lot and would be doing it in some fashion for to make money had shining shoes. find something you would do for free. let that put the light in your eyes. it makes you a better husband, father, neighbor, citizen when you have that light in your eyes and you are a pleasant person to be around. did you find everything you need? that is on aisle seven? find something. it could be planting flowers. especially if you can do something where there was not something before. rearrange the furniture. tavis: i am glad you said that. senselways gotten the that part of what turns you on is the chance to create something every day. there are a couple of tracks i have heard you do a thousand but the way you do it with this orchestra. greatestall one of the love songs ever, or what? >> he wrote the music, and i did the lyrics. yes, it's a sweetheart love song. i like to say for one moment there was a place called camelot. toe used that in reference america where we have gotten beyond our differences. it might have even been a woman at the time. i like what happened in that song. we sing it every night. spain, butould be you never sing it the same way. you create something different every time. >> that's one of the commandments of improvisation. improvisation is happening right where guys 'n roll are improvising. step out there and venture and create something tonight that and let't do last night that person make you play a little differently than you did. there was a lady in the audience. that's the commandment. jazz brought this sense of democracy. marquee, may be on the but it's you. it takes a great deal of courage. improvise live on stage every day. show and telle show, then of the time they're going to play each song. sound, butway they there's no improvisation. you step out every night and improvise live in front of us. that takes a lot of courage. >> i've learned it from the people who have done it before. thank you for paying that wonderful complement. i would like to say it, but you did. tavis: you make mention of citizens. word i use. it the american people. i prefer fellow citizen. if you don't know -- if you know al jarreau you know he has thoughts about everything. just give me your thoughts about the nation. talk to me about how we are doing. >> there is a group. it's all the industrialized nations. we mention them because they are our friends. lead the world in things the world needs leadership in. amongst them, we are the only ones without national health care. hospitalt go to the and not worry about falling into bankruptcy. they go to university. we are killing our students with debt. that scares me. though 405 is the worst freeway to the airport i have driven on. our infrastructure is falling apart. somebody has threatened washington with you cannot raise tax dollars, and it has got to come from deep pockets. use our highways, use our airports, use our libraries, use our universities, and they hoard it away and sit in an office and moved the rose and decimal andts -- and move zeroes decimal points around. it breaks my heart. there are a lot of things that .eed some help >> i have two days to go, and i can do this for days. given all our fellow citizens are up against, when they take our money and choose to spend it to come see al jarreau, you're going to give them the best show you can give them, but given what the people are up against, umph inat put a little your performance? thatat's always been there my audience is not flush with money. these are people who work hard to see me. audience, but my audience has always been people who are struggling to stay in the middle class. everyday people. i've got 30 seconds. of our dearlys department friend, george duke. >> we celebrate george every night since he went back to the from which he came from. tavis: i love it. al jarreau is welcome on this show any time. first guestas my from my first show. we didn't want this to end without him paying a visit. him in town.ught >> tavis for president. isis: the latest project called " al jarreau and the metro orchestra live." i love you. give my best to susan. that's our show for tonight. as always, keep the faith. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a conversation with dennis haysbert and dilbert creator scott adams. that's next time. we'll see you then. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> be more. pbs.
WETA
Nov 2, 2013 1:00am EDT
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with two of the founding members of tower of power. over the years, they have toured constantly and released more than 20 albums. their latest is called "hipper than hip." it features the or and section that defines their distinctive sound. tower ofation with power, coming up right now. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. asis: tower of power started . cover band they became the back bone of the driving mourn sound that came to define twoer of -- tower of power. their latest album is a double disc set called "hipper than hip." is is from the 40th anniversary cd. it's called "what is hip?" ♪ ♪ tavis: still sounding good, man. still sounding good. whatever happened to the bands with the great worn sections? >> were there that many? tavis: more than there are today. >> that's true. i guess they gave up. less music in the schools, there are fewer horn players coming out. guys want to play guitar and synthesizer. link -- ihink that think you are right about th
WETA
Nov 7, 2013 12:00am EST
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight a conversation with dennis haysbert. the documentary looks at the war .hrough documents and artifacts then we will turn to a conversation with scott adams "how to failalled at almost everything and still win big." dennis haysbert and scott adams coming up right now. ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: the next two years to commemorate the end of the civil war, the smoke finian -- the smithsonian is dedicating a including aat time, program called fight for freedom and hosted by actor dennis haysbert. take a look at the clip from the series. >> every ship had a list of all the goods and he was on the ship. this one is taking 83 people from virginia to natchez to be sold in the cotton and sugar plantation. documenting the people. it has people's names, their coloring, their age, where they are from. sometimes people were sold multiple times. i'm going to make an assumption. i doubt you have done any project where you learned more. i could be wrong. further.d go a step artifact iow what was going to be discussing until the cameras were rolling. >> they cap you in suspense? can understand how that would have an emotional impact on what i was doing. it's really interesting shooting. this is going to be a fascinating show. i was watching ashley judd last night. i was happy go lucky. a lot of this was kind of dour for me. it hurt, and i was kind of liberated in my thinking of all the people that came together to try to stop this and try to end , so i have a whole new outlook on the people who tried to exacerbate the situation. dark period ina the nations history. the other hand, there are some artifacts that speak to the courage and commitment of people. if you get a chance to look at harriet tubman's artifacts, that >> it does,u up. especially if you find out how tiny she was. she was powerful. you can't tell if you gave away your position. it was almost military like. it was enriching to find out all the stories behind these artifacts. hope every child, man, woman can watch this show. if you really want to learn about what it was like in those days, the good, the bad, the ugly, indifferent, you should watch this. you have aow foundation, but there is one that work specifically with young kids, and i found myself speaking to a classroom of kids all across the country. when the subject of harriet tubman comes up, i will have a short person about the size of her, and it is amazing to watch the eyes of these kids, and you size her up. you say, this is the size of harriet tubman, and every kid in the classroom goes, woe. small inrealize how stature she was. i make the point said k neil wasn't the first -- shaquille o'neal wasn't the first tall negro. it is amazing. i always bring the shortest person in the classroom and the tallest arson in the classroom. in classroom.son i say, she is leading them to freedom. was a gun and a bible. you are not going to give up your position. if you go back they will kill you. be able to see all that is pretty amazing. marry, she did finally she married someone 20 years her junior. of for a woman. tavis: is there anything you learned about yourself hosting this series? a whole bunch of stuff. i learned how steadfast i am and how i approach life. this show how cruel things were. side i found bits that didn't quite jive with what was going on. wrote andone book he hat his family wrote. he was enslaved. he was allowed to leave for the weekend and go to the next plantation. in all the inhumanity going on, that was very human. still, he had to go to the next plantation to visit his wife. -- littleitzer butterings of humanity, it's still kind of hard to see humanity as a whole in that situation. if you could have humanity in degrees. there are degrees to which people view humanity. >> what people also learned is that slavery is not looked upon as a great or cool enterprise. it was looked down on by a lot of people, but it was also the oft lucrative. it was kind mind blowing. on the one hand people say it is such a arable business. what do you say to that? great a is they have so much stuff in their vault. i would love to run through the hallways. they have everything in there. every now and then they open up the vault. this is a three part series. there are two other parts. if you haven't seen them, i am sure you can go online. ends talkinges about the pathway to freedom. coming up, a conversation with "dilbert" creator scott adams. stay with us. "dilbert" is without question one of the most successful syndicated comic strips. it is appearing in 70 countries and 25 languages. says yourt creator learn more from failure than success. he has written a new book with the title "how to fail at almost ."erything and still win big good to have you. why this book and why now? >> i noticed 80% of the world has never met a famous or successful person. a lot of people have no mentors or role models. even if they know somebody they don't watch them go to work. i think the failures are more than successes. -- instructive than successes. give me one example of what you mean by your own personal failure. failure, --out my >> without my failure "dilbert" would not have existed. i tried to be a computer programmer. topent two years trying write games. it turns out i'm not a good programmer. i am working on an internet startup on the side, and all these things become knowledge you end up using somehow. they were beyond interesting. they are in some ways counter intuitive. bs argue that passion is when it comes to success. everyone says you have to be passionate about what you engage in. you say that is crap. >> when people get interviewed and they say, what is the secret to your success, they almost always say passion. what are the other answers? they would be embarrassing. i am smarter than you. how about, i got lucky? how about, my dad was rich. he got me started. none of those answers sound good. andabout, i was passionate, if you were more passionate you would be a billionaire. always a little excited in the beginning. if it works, i get real passionate. it drainsn't work, right out of here. if not passion, there has to be some energy, some drive. >> i write about taking care of your body. learn fitness and diet. i'm not telling you how to do that. i think you should make it a lifelong study. the people who know about those things get the best result because they make smarter choices. healthier it is going to be better. don't you said you believe in goals. you believe in systems. your point, but for those who will hear that at first hence and say, what does have against goals? >> they only work if you have a system. if your goal is to lose 10 pounds, you're going to fail until you get there. if you get there are you done? better thing would be to make it a lifetime study. if you are thinking about things in terms of a system, it just works out. my system for success was from my college days i knew i would try a lot of things. work. them wouldn't i tried a number of things like writing video games. my system is if it doesn't work make sure you are smarter at the end. -- look at me is the perfect example. i'm an average artist at best. i never took a writing class but i can put a sentence together. i'm not the funniest guy. i have three eggs. -- three things. individually the skills are just ok. >> be on skills you talk about experiences. do, the things you can more things you can do. you talk about golf and about how that has aided and abetted you in many ways. >> it's also about knowledge. the more you know, the more you can know. i make sure i am learning something every day. if somebody came from outer space and said, can you explain what all worse is? it would take a long time, but if the second quest -- what a horse is? it would take a long time, but if the second question is what is the zebra. you are halfway there if you have got a basis. tavis: if one size does not fit learn more from our failures than we ever do from there sosses, why are many books about success and failure? it is not like my success works for anyone else. why is this such a burgeoning business of self-help books? >> everybody wants a quick fix. everyone wants the promise of success. my advice was don't take advice from a cartoonist on anything that could get you killed or fired, but rather, if you have a chance, if you have the option, the first day he will always do is talk to somebody who did it. you will say, you tried this. what did you do? if you talk to a few people, you can say, this guided this. that work. i offer my story. tavis: having said that, take me back and give me a sense of how you failed your way into dilbert. >> when my corporate career , first at the bank and then the phone company, i started looking around, and it was part of my process of, let me try some a new and see if it works. when i tried to syndicate dilbert, the first reaction was this is poorly drawn, and i but what i found is there is a small core of people that are wild from the start. that turns out to be a good indicator you have got something worth doubling down on. the things people say, that is pretty good, but it's just talking. to dont somebody something with their body. if somebody says, i liked your book, i say thank you. tell me if the book is going to be good. said, i liked your book and there is somebody i want to give it to, that is always a good indicator. on dilbert there was one guy who organized it by topic and put them in a book he created. about the value of having a lack of fear or embarrassment. think it might be natural to me. i don't get embarrassed at the same things other people do. say the biggest thing that holds me back is i am going to look like an idiot if this doesn't work out. people don't care. they care about themselves. part of it is making sure people that don't speak in front of crowds because they are nervous just to it a lot. at the end you are like, i will stand in front of a thousand people, and if it doesn't go be funny. will that was thesay, worst speech. you can learn to harden yourself against embarrassment. i wonder whether or not your mission with "dilbert" when you started, has it changed? whatever you were intending to content of"dilbert ," has it changed? >> at first it was just a job, but when it took to business focused people started taking it seriously. it did become a lot of comics your desk.ft on it became weapon eyes. in some way it helped curb the excess. weaponized. tavis: you argue for those who say money can't i you happiness, they are wrong. y happiness, they are wrong. >> they are totally wrong. that $75,000 a year is a magic number, but my experience is more is better up to a point. then there is a point that doesn't make a difference. tavis: your argument is money can't buy you happiness because money gets you freedom, and the freedom allows you to do what you want to do when you want to do it. >> happiness is nothing but good health and freedom, and money is the best way to buy the freedom. if nothing else there is someone who would like your money and you can help them out. tavis: it's somewhat .ounterintuitive that is what you promise in the book. "how to fail at almost everything and still win big." it's not an advice book. it's a book of information. scott, congrats on the book, and good to have you on the program. that's our show for tonight. thanks for joining us. faith.ys, keep the back for more information, visit pbs.org.ley at tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a conversation with me along. -- nia long. that's next time. we'll see you then. ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you.
WETA
Nov 5, 2013 6:00pm EST
tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
WETA
Nov 4, 2013 6:00pm EST
you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
WETA
Nov 12, 2013 6:30pm EST
>>> this is "nightly business report" with tyler mathisen and susie gharib brought to you in part by. >> thestreet.com, up to the minute stock market news and in depth analysis. our quant rating service provides objective independent ratings daily on over 4300 stocks. learn more at the street.com/nbr. >>> clear for take off, american and u.s. airways settle anti-trust charges and will merge to become the world's largest airline. >>> healthy, new guidelines from the american heart association on the use of stat tants. will it be a game changer? >> happy holidays ahead? reports of earnings over the next couple weeks with a look at the strength of the consumer. that and more for "nightly business report" for tuesday, november 12th. >>> good evening everyone. i'm sue herrera in for system susie gharib. >> i'm tyler mathisen. welcome. the world's biggest airline is about to take off, they settled anti trust charges planning a merger for american airlines and u.s. airways but not before resting concessions aimed as protecting the consumer and making sure the new airline won't be too big. shares of u.s. airways ended about 1% higher, shares of american airlines that began trading on exchange after bankruptcy shot up 26%. let's take a look at what the changes may be in store at the combined airlines and what it means for travelers and investors. >> reporter: with more than 6700 flight as day, the new american airlines will be the world's largest but both partners must pay a price. to get the 16 million dollar deal done and settle anti trust charges brought by the justice department, american and u.s. airways will give up, take off and landing slots and gates at seven congested big city airports such as boston, chicago, dallas, los angeles, miami, new york and washington d.c. some of the more noticeable changes will be in the nation's capital with a new american will operate 44 fewer departures a day than two partners currently have giving up 104 take off and landing slots. 16 of those slots will be offered to jetblue, the 88 others will be distributed to other airlines. at new york's laguardia, they will give up 44 take off and landing spots and five gates. bill bear of the doj's anti trust division said the settlement will quote disrupt the cozy relationships among the legacy carriers, increase access to congested airports and provide consumers with more choices. why was the doj so wary of the merger? for one thing, it will be the fourth big merger in the past five years and once the deal closes next month, the nation's four largest airlines will control roughly 85% of all domestic airline seats. >> and joining us now to talk more about the airline industry is helane becker. good to see you, welcome. >> thank you very much for having me. >> let's start with who the big winner is for this, the larger carries because now they have access to new gates or the smaller carriers because they have access to new gates? >> well, of course, u.s. aways and american will have to sell the gates and they will go to the slots at laguardia and dca specifically, so it will go to auction and the highest bidder will be the winner. you know, if southwest and jetblue which are operating some of the slots now, if they choose not to bid, others can. >> what will happen to fares? >> unbalanced, we've seen costs increase and that said -- as a result fares have gone up and that is likely because cost is going up. that's really the way to think about that. having said that, we expect that the slots and the gates that will be divested will encourage. jetblue is expanding in boston and we expect them to continue and obviously that will help consumers in giving them choices. >> the airline industry mergers, we've seen so many. are there less out there that seem logical to you? >> right, i think not. i mean, that doesn't mean after a few years there won't be others. we've -- this is the second time in my career that i've seen major technology improvements in aircraft and a mayor consolidation. the last time we talked about the top ten airlines controlling, now we're seeing the top four. i don't think there is a lot left to consolidate. >> i was looking at a list of the best performing s&p 500 stocks and i believe delta is on it. is there any particular stock in this sector that you are more high on than others? >> well, i guess no pun intended there, right? the airlines have been really high flying stocks all year long. we really like delta. that's been a top pick of ours all year. we like united. that's been another. spirit. we've been pretty over rate on the group all year long, primarily because we're encouraged by the fact that airlines are focused on returning and capital to shareholders and focused on limiting capacity group, limiting capital spending. so, you know, we're pretty optimistic about the group and we think technology improvements in the aircraft will be hugely beneficial and so will consolidation. we're looking at the industry being able to report profits in 2014, as well as 2013. >> all right. thank you so much for joining us tonight. helane becker -- >> thanks for having me. >>> stocks ended mostly lower today but not by much with some blaming mixed messages from federal reserve officials. traders got spooked after one fed president said the central bank stimulus program can't go on forever. later another said he could see tapering begin in march and then a third fed bank president said that the central banks monetary easing plans should remain in place. the dow backing away from month's record close. it was off 3 points. the nasdaq ended a fraction of a point higher and the s&p was down four. treasury prices under pressure today on fears about the fed tapering the stimulus program. the yield on the benchmark ten-year note fell slightly to finish at 2.77% and crude prices fell more than $2 a barrel closing at the lowest level since the end of may. >> well, despite today's dip, the dow is up more than 20% this year but ray, the founder of the hedge fund bridge water associates has a much more bleak outlook for the decade. if stock prices continue to rise, returns will head lower. >> i think over the next ten years, equities will have about a 4% return. as you lower the expect of return and do not lower the expected risk of equities, increasing, there is a movement more to cash, as you have a greater appreciation in the price because of that, you have less wealth effect and each inextrament of wealth effect has less impact on spending. federal reserve will not be able to raise interest rates for a number of years. >> he advised investors to create a balance between stocks, bonds and cash on account of narrowing return rates on each investment. >>> walmart wants a jump on this year's friday black friday shopping. they will open at 6:00 p.m., two hours earlier than last year and offering exclusive black friday deals at walmart.com, and those beginnerly on thanksgiving morning. >> and walmart is among some of the nation's biggest retailers reporting the latest quarterly earnings this week, and more importantly, giving investors their outlook on the all important holiday shopping period. courtney region has more. >> reporter: with traffic down in shopping malls and lackluster sales and investors are wondering how much pressure the government shutdown and new health care laws are adding to consumer spending, and how much falling gas prices are helping. as a flurry of retailers report earnings in the coming days, wall street will find out. but while investors want to know how the back to school third quarter ultimately turned out, that's in the past. holiday hopes are hanging on those all important fourth quarter forecasts. >> we're very concerned what they will all say about the fourth quarter. we're not so concerned what they report in the third quarter, especially if they say something like it strengthened. >> reporter: first is macy's reporting earnings before the opening bell tomorrow. the department store disappointed last quarter, though, suggested the sales weakness is temporary. many believe the magic of ma sees will surface this weekend. the largest retailer reports thursday and it will send ripple effects throughout the market. a lot is weighing whether the dow will post a third disappointing quarter. not everyone think walmart's outlook will set a pool in the stocking this holiday season. >> sale haves been good at walmart for the last three weeks. the last two weeks of october and first week of november. if that's true, i think they are likely to be less guarded on commentary. >> reporter: while walmart will set a tone they met up with closely watched and widely names reporting including best buy, home depot, j.c. penney or tjmaxx. >>> still ahead, new guidelines from the heart organization could reshape how stat tents are used but what does this mean for the drug company making them. p . >>> a big set back for a medication aimed at treating heart disease. the drug failed in a trail for heart attacks, strokes or death twh added to patient's care which may include a cholesterol treatment, aspirin or blood pressure medications. shares of glaxo fell more than 1.5% today. >>> new recommendations for americans at risk for serious medical conditions and statents. hampton pearson has that story. >> reporter: they focus on the use on statents to lower the risk of heart attack, stroke and diabetes sgl diabetes. >> this is certainly a departure from guidelines where the focus was getting your cholesterol to goal and now the focus is on trying to get started on medication and take the highest dose that you can tolerate. >> reporter: the heart association and american college of cardiology identify four patient groups for whom taking stat tents lorer risk. those with bad cholesterol levels, patients with type two die bee bee ttees and patients a cardiovascular profile. >> the new recommendations really reaffirm the importance on treating cholesterol levels in the highest risk populations. those with established heart disease, those with diabetes and those with genetic cholesterol problems. >> reporter: analysts say there is no question statents are the big gorilla, 214 million prescriptions a year, a 17% increase in the last five years. two of the biggest sellers, lipator has gone off patent. crestor go go off 2015. they say it won't offset the lost revenues from those expiring patents. >> at that point and the generic life cycle doesn't help generic firm. >> the next generation of patented stat tents is in the pipeline, meanwhile doctors emphasize drugs are no substitute for a heart healthy lifestyle that include as good diet, exercise and a lot less stress where possible. for "nightly business report" i'm hampton pearson in washington here to talk about giepd lines is barbara a managing director with fti, you heard that package. do you think that's a need m mov mover. >> lipator and crestor and pfizer more increased attention and crestor but since their patents go off in 2016 their investors won't get too excited. we have drugs coming from down the pipeline one in phase three, a novel target that could be given once for ze real weeks. i think the other message communicated earlier serves really been a movement from treat to goal and a focus on what the actual cholesterol number is, but rather the patients at high risk should be treated, number one, irrespective of their cholesterol levels and two that they should be treated aggressively with higher doses of statents, which i think those are the change here. >> and does that change the guidelines in your opinion for other chronic diseases like diabetes which is on the rise and the like or not? >> well, i think, you know, in some respects, i mean, keep in mind that the statants have been on the market and are safe but this early and aggressive treatment and prevention, you know, with good healthy lifestyles is probably contributing to chronic diseases. >> do you have a feeling on the number of individuals will expand as a result of it? are we talking about a 20% expansion, 80% expansion? any guess? >> my guess would be you're talking 10 to 15% and that would come from the fact patients are targeted for treatment, sort of irrespective of what their cholesterol level is but rather as a function of their risk for card vascular disease and morbidities associated. >> the trend expanding rapidly towards wellness, general wellness and general well being and intervening in your lifestyle earlier in your life so that you don't have some of these issues later on, or they aren't as extreme later on. >> i think it's a great point, sue, and i think it's absolutely true and will continue to be the case. one is, we as consumers will bear more of the burden of our health care so we'll have an economic incentive and health outcome incentive to do that. and the other is that i think, you know, the therapies and awareness and availability of better treatment regulimes earl on. cancer is becoming a chronic disease, rather than an acute life-threatening condition. >> barbara, thank you very much as always. >> thanks for having me. great to see you. >> likewise. >> barbara managing director at fti consulting. >>> the largest u.s. home builder reported a big rise in sales and that's where we begin tonight's market focus. d.r. horton profit increased 40%. the home builder benefitted from a pickup in home sales as mortgage rates eased a bit in october. the stock popped almost 5% to $18.91. >>> dish network added more subscribers than wall street expected in the third quarter helping lift that stock. the satellite tv provider easily beat revenue estimates. the 35,000 new dish subscribers topped estimates, but the increase was well short of the 135,000 customers that it's rival direct tv tacked on. didn't seem to shake investors much today. the shock jumped 6% to $50.35. >>> and jos. a. bank upped the third quarter outlook thanks to a rise in sales. they aren't set to report earnings until december but the positive outlook two days before the proposed take over bid will expire. shares rose 3.5%. >>> starbucks must pay kraft after the early termination of a grocery deal. starbucks has to pay about a half billion in interest and attorneys fees. the decision came after the closing bell prompting starbucks shares to go down just a bit. kraft shares popped and finished the trading day at $51.96. >>> the activist investor dan low disclosed he has a stake in fed fedex. he said he met with fedex ceo and doesn't want to see him replace. it set them higher after it was down crowded this morning for lack of a mayor near term. it popped to $134.76. >>> leap frog was up grated from a market perform to an out perform. analysts sited the position in educational toys is the reason why the stock looks attractive to them. the report sent shares to $7.97. >>> tablet sales are expected to be strong this year but tablet maker haves come under fire lately for targeting the devices to young kids who critics say are spending too much time in front of the screens. josh lipton has more. >> reporter: kids are using mobile devices including tablets a lot more. in the past two years, the average amount of time children eight years old and younger are spending on mobile devices tripped from 5 minutes a day to 15 minutes a day, according to common sense media and groups. stephanie says it's big business. >> the total toy industry is $20 billion and certainly electronics and entertainment properties are a growing percentage so i think it's viable to say this is about a billion-dollar market in the u.s. >> reporter: samsung is the latest tech company moving into the market. the new galaxy tablet kids tablet is available in the u.s. and amazon, best buy and toys r us. it comes with a 7 inch display, the cost, $229. leap frog is also a player in the space with it's leap pad ultra designed for the 4-9-year-old set and has all the bells and whistle, 7 inch display, camera and mp 3 player and they can view sites approved. the cost $149. or v tech invo tab three. the american academy of pediatrics discourages screen time for kids under two, pediatricians i spoke to says it can impact development. despite the concerns, there is no deny thing is a lucktive area for tech. for older kids, parents should be aware of the time their kids are spending in front of screens and limit screen time to just one to two hours per day. i'm josh lipton, "nightly business report", silicon valley. >> hope my kids were watching that report. >>> coming up, mexico quickly becoming a major hub of auto manufacturing, but will it come at the cost of american jobs? >>> a merger between urenex ex the exchange is come plait and they will begin trading tomorrow, thus nlding tending t independent run of the new york stock exchange. it can be tramsed back to may of 1792. >>> the president of the philippines says the death toll will likely be no more than 2500, far less than the previous estimate of 10,000. a risk assessment firm says total insured losses from that storm will be less than $100 million but to be clear that is just insured losses. damages to uninsured homes and businesses are expected to be far greater. >>> with the new car sales in the u.s. climbing to their highest levels in six years, auto manufacturing has also revved up. auto plants in the u.s. are close to full capacity, so big auto makers are expanding and adding more assembly lines. not here in the u.s. but in mexico. phil lebeau has the story. >> reporter: it looks like any other auto plant in the year but nissan's lines in mexico represent the latest surge in north america for the japanese auto maker. >> we're building a second plant, 175,000 cars a year. capable of doing four cars, mexico becoming the export hub for americas return nissan's expansion is one reason mexico passed canada and closing the gap with the u.s. for car production. >> mexico is proven for a long time and not just years but for a long time for us it's a fantastic world class quality operation. >> reporter: what's driving mexico's auto boom? the country's central location and numerous trade agreements allow auto companies to export from there to europe, even asia. auto makers make a fraction of the wage line workers make north of the border. >> somebody in mexico might make 3 or $4 an hour. an out toe worker in ohio might be making five to eight times more than that. >> reporter: the brookings institute estimate half of the auto jobs will be in mexico by the end of this decade. that growth may limit the expansion and hiring at u.s. auto plants and another sign of surging mexican auto industry is impacting lives north and south of the boarder. phil lebeau, mexico. >>> and for more on the rapidly growing auto manufacturing industry in mexico, head to our website, nbr.com. >>> finally tonight, tuesday is not usually a popular day to say i do but today's calendar date is 11/12/13, a highly lly desi day. according to davids bridle, 800% more than a year ago and next year maybe bigger, 12/13/14 will be the last calendar date this century with three sequence l numbers and that falls on a saturday. >> that will do it for "nightly business report", i'm sue herrera. >> i'm tyler mathisen, have a great night everyone and hope to see you back here tomorrow night. >>> "nightly business report" has been brought to you by -- >> thestreet.com, up to the minute stock market news and in depth analysis. our quant rating service provides objective independent ratings daily on over 4300 stocks, learn more at the street.com/nbr.
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Nov 1, 2013 7:00pm EDT
security worker to death at los angeles international airport and wounded at least two other people. the attack touched off chaos as rescue workers rushed to get the victims away, and travelers took refuge outside if they could. airport police chief patrick gannon said there was no warning. >> an individual came into terminal three of this airport, pulled a assault rifle out of a bag and began to open fire in the terminal. he proceeded up into the screening area where t.s.a. screeners are and continued shooting and went past the screeners back into the airport itself. >> woodruff: the gunman ultimately shot it out with police and, apparently, was wounded before being captured. the associated press identified him as 23-year-old paul ciancia of the los angeles area. for a time, the incident caused the federal aviation administration to ground all departures from l.a.x. flights bound there from other cities were ordered not to take off. iraqi prime minister nouri al- maliki appealed today for u.s. help against violent attacks by al-qaeda militants. he wound up a washington visit this w
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Nov 7, 2013 11:00pm EST
. he is an actor, a director, an artist. he's also an author. the los angeles angels of anaheim described him as -- the "los angeles times" described him as the prince of perpetual motion. his new book is called "actor anonymous" and here is the trailer for the book. >> i am the actor. >> i am the actor. >> i am the actor. >> i am the actor. >> i'm an actor so i can play anything. everyone is in me and i am in everyone. i'm part of your consciousness. >> you don't think so? you want to deny i've made my way inside? >> look, i'm here to entertain you, but i don't really care about anything, you know what i mean? >> i used to care a lot about acting. but now i see that you're only as good as your material. >> and if your material is good, you're only as good as your director. >> there's so much dependence on others that i can't care about acting anymore. >> i'm jack nicholson and marlon gran bran doe, jimmy stewart, steve mcqueen. >> i'm nicholas cage and robert pattinson, james dean and rock hudson. >> i am norma shearer and lillian gish. >> i'm garbo. >> i'm like a sophisticated
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Nov 13, 2013 12:00am EST
tavis: good evening from los angeles. tonight come a conversation with grammy-winning singer steve gyro -- steve tyrell. the songs of semicon. he will perform two of the most endearing. glad you have joined us, conversation from steve tyrell coming up right now. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: grammy winner steve tyrell is introduction to popular moves -- popular music started at age 19. burts already working with bacharach. he went on to work with bonnie raitt before striking out as a performer in his own right. his latest cd is called "it's magic, the songs of semicon. kohn."ammy a little sneak review you did to this before the record even drive. >> last year. it was this semi-con -- it was the sammy kohn centennial. he was a great writer. nominatedll, he was 27 times for the academy awards, which is unbelievable. people wouldthat ask him what comes first, the music or the lyrics? he would say the phone call. [laughter] that is where he got his inspiration. five golden globes, just an amazing lyricist. year.xtending that this i
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Nov 1, 2013 8:00pm EDT
gwen: winners and losers everywhere you look. on health care, spycraft and politics. tonight on "washington week." the promise in 2010. >> if you like your insurance plan, you will keep it. no one will be able to take that away from you. it hasn't happened yet and won't happen in the future. gwen: the walkback in 2013. >> if insurers decided to downgrade or cancel these substandard plans, what we said under the law is you got to row place them with quality comprehensive coverage. gwen: complicated explanations almost never work in politics. >> the majority of americans feel tricked by the rollout of the president's health care law. we were told if you liked what you had you could keep it. obviously a trick. gwen: the administration, can it dig itself out of its health care hole? >> hold me accountable for the debacle. i'm responsible. gwen: can it justify what appears to be years of widespread exhaustive spying at home and abroad? >> we only spy for valid foreign intelligence purposes as authorized by law with multiple layers of oversight to ensure we don't abuse our authorities. gwen: covering the week, tom gjelten of n.p.r. doyle mcmanus of the "los angeles times." alexis simendinger of realclearpolitics. and karen tumulty of "the washington post." >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens, live from our nation's capital this is "washington week with gwen ifill." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we went out and asked people a simple question -- how old is the oldest person you've known? we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us have known someone who's lived well into their 90's. and that's a great thing. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn't changed, the official retirement age. the question is, how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years? >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by northrop grumman. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to pbs stations from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. it's supposed to get better. but so far, when it comes to the affordable care act, everything just seems to be getting if not worse at least murkier. low enrollment, canceled policies, and in the week's signature moment, 3 1/2 hours of grilling for the administration's top health official. witness this exasperated exchange. >> so the president ult ultimately is responsible. while it's great that you're a team player and taking responsibility, it is the president's ultimate responsibility, correct? >> you clearly -- whatever. yes, he is the president. he is responsible for government programs. gwen: that's a key point. because more than anything else, health care opponents want to link the problems with the law to the president himself. and to more essential flaws. mitch mcconnell said as much to me this week. >> the point is could anybody make it work? i don't think albert einstein could make this thing work. it can't work. it won't work. and so i feel sorry for her being put in a position where she's trying to make something work out that won't. gwen: having mitch mcconnell feel sorry for you is never a good thing if you're a democrat. so couldine stein make this thing work, karen? >> it depends on what this thing is. the computer systems, maybe a few more tech support people could make it work. maybe they should bring over the n.s.a. for that. but almost certainly the computer bugs that have made it almost impossible for a lot of people to sign up, that is going to get fixed. maybe not on the time line that people would like to see. and then we find out whether it really works. because what's going to happen, what has to happen, for this health care system to work as president obama has promised us that it will, is that a lot of healthy people are going to have to sign up for these exchanges along with sick people. we know that people with pre-existing conditions, with illnesses, we know that they are very motivated and they are going to sit there and do whatever it takes to get into these exchanges. now the question is, is it going to function well enough that young healthy people will as well? gwen: we know that right now, young healthy people or anybody can't really get on the site. and that the administration is guilty of at least overstating whether people would be able to keep the coverage they want right now. >> one of the things that has emerged and we've all read about it and probably know people who've talked about this is that there are a small but sizable number of americans, a percentage that's roughly 5%, are in the individual market, that have gotten letters from their insurance companies. private insurance companies. these are the plans that they supposedly liked and wanted to keep. the ones that the president -- gwen: individual market, not covered by their employer. >> not medicare, not v.a. not in these large pools already. they're out there on their own. so they've got letters from the insurance companies saying we have to either change and offer you a different set of policies that in some cases might cost more or we're going to encourage you to go into the pool because we're revoking or ending this particular plan. because it doesn't meet the prescriptions of the law. and so a larger number than the administration imagined by this time, one month in, are getting letters that are -- making them feel that they have been left in the lurch. gwen: and if the solution is to get online and get an alternate policy they can't do that. >> and in fact the president this week gave a speech in boston and told -- encouraged people to do that. go online. shop. that's what it's for, he said. that's what the website is for. >> let's go back to the website where this whole mess kind of started. do we know when that website is going to be up and running? and what's the effect on the problem? karen mentioned that you want young healthy people to sign up. if the website is delayed. >> so today, we had an update from the new manager of this challenge. his name is jeffrey szion and he gave a one-week update and he said that they are on track to meet the deadline they've set an arbitrary deadline for themselves to have this working by the end of november. he also said we expect unexpected things including some technical outages that they actually had this week where they lost hours of time for people to be able to use the site. they're patching it at night now. from 1:00 to 5:00 a.m. they're going to do some more fixing this weekend. so within a month, he's saying the website should be working smoothly for the majority of people. >> is there a worst case scenario here? if the -- if the website is not fixed in time, does the whole thing at some point, does -- it's based on an equilibrium, i assume. and if everything starts to fall apart, does -- what happens then? >> well, as people have until april to sign up for this thing or begin to pay a penalty. if they don't sign up. but the truth is that a lot of these policies on the individual market are now going to be canceled. come january. and so a lot of these people, if it's not up and running by then, are going to be left in the lurch. and the individual market is -- it's a difficult place to buy insurance now. because people go in, they don't have a lot of information. often they buy policies that are skimpy. the administration says that president obama is promised that if you like what you have you can keep it. that they had grandfathered in all these old policies. the fact is the grandfather clause didn't work. it excluded a lot of people. and it was -- gwen: and could opt out of it. >> companies could opt out of it and also didn't apply to any policy that was written after the middle of 2010. and most people renew these policies year to year. so a lot of those people are going to be in the lurch. gwen: let's speak more -- broader about -- isn't the whole idea of insurance that you're supposed to be in a risk pool, that you're supposed to share the risk and paying for something you won't necessarily get? and the complaints about these canceled policies are people not getting the policy they want is they're paying for something that they didn't want. like maternity care if they're single. >> if there's any analysis this week that pointed to the communications flubs in this whole -- the administration was left being beatenest head -- beaten over the head about getting people out of what they call subpar insurance plans and people clinging to those plans if they were wonderful things you can keep. you know you have a problem in an administration when you're trying to sell a benefit and you're finding that the marketplace is clinging to something you consider -- >> there are people who will argue that they just need insurance to really cover them in case of catastrophe. there are people who will say look, i will pay for my own mammogram if my insurance pays for my breast cancer. and so since the administration, since they wrote this bill with a gigantic benefits policy that covers a lot of preventative care, a lot of benefits that maybe you won't use if you're a man, you won't get pregnant. there's an argument that preventative care saves money in the long run. but a lot of people are saying hey, look, i just want my insurance there for the emergency. >> a number of members of congress say if this is such a mess and can't sign up for it can't we just postpone the deadlines? give people some slack in terms of when they have to sign up. >> any real conversation going on -- >> the administration doesn't seem to want to talk about it. >> a number of democrats are now joining republicans in arguing for this. including a number of senate democrats whose jobs are on the line in the next election. gwen: has there been any discussion at the white house, alexis, about this, about a aying, denying, or concession they should have done that sooner? >> yeah. this is the answer we get. that is very realistic assessment they're making. if the website cannot be fixed, really truly fixed to allow the kind of shopping that you would envision, within a certain range of time leading up to the january deadline, january 1 deadline, as you know, insurers normally -- for all the paperwork we need several weeks. the plan goes into effect. you can be insured january 1. or you can be insured all the way until march 31 which is what we were just talking about. so the administration is saying holding the line, we don't think we need to enroll. but what they're telling democrats quietly is listen, if it turns out that all of these people that we need for these risk pools, not just older and sicker but the younger and the healthier, if they're not signing up, then we may have to reassess. gwen: and there's the political fix question. which we're still waiting to see whether they come up with one at the white house. the president was in massachusetts this week. and he was making the case that it took a while for them to get their health care plan right. and he also was -- began the digging exercise. let's listen to a little bit of what he had to say. >> there's no denying it. right now, the website is too slow, too many people have gotten stuck. and i am not happy about it. and neither are a lot of americans who need health care. and they're trying to figure out how they can sign up as quickly as possible. so there's no excuse for it. and i take full responsibility for making sure it gets fixed asap. we are working overtime to improve it every day. gwen: everybody's taking responsibility. anything changing? >> well, again, if this gets fixed in a few days or a week, i think that the long-term consequences may not be so bad. gwen: give it a little more than a week, karen. >> but this does remind me of in the tone of the president's voice, reminds me of the b.p. oil spill. where you could just sort of see the frustration. and yet, you say i take responsibility. and yet nobody's lost their job over this. who exactly is being held to account for this? >> during the big shutdown debate the president over and over said that once that was behind us, he was open to negotiation. is there any kind of negotiation taking place? are there -- what happened to the medical devices tax? are there any legislative changes that might now be considered? >> i think those sorts of things might come up in the budget negotiations which actually began this week. we haven't seen a conference committee in a long time. we actually saw one. but i don't think that things like that are going to be put on the table in the middle of just trying to get this working. gwen: final. >> i think that the administration is going to continue to try to give these updates, that incrementally every day things are getting fixed and hope that that turns out to be the truth. gwen: we'll be watching it. because that's what we do. thanks to both of you. now, another look at the rapidly accumulating evidence that very little you communicate or that the german chancellor communicates for that matter is really private. the latest drip, drip, drip from former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden suggests that the nation's biggest tech companies are being breached, too. and as far as we know, it's all legal. is that right, tom? >> well, that's being debated. and i'm not a lawyer. so i sort of deal with things on a dumbed down level. gwen: ok. do that. >> there's one rule that basically underlies all the law here. which is you can't spy on americans without a court order. gwen: right. >> but apparently you can spy on foreigners. and that's what these latest rounds of disclosures have involved. whether it's spying on angela merkel or in this case the n.s.a. found a way to intercept the data as it was transiting through data links into data centers that were held by google and yahoo in europe. so the argument would seem to be, the legal argument would seem to be because those data centers are in europe, they're not -- they can assume they're not american data. therefore, it was legal to go in. however, the data companies, google and yahoo, are absolutely furious about this. for various reasons. one of them is that their reputations have now been tainted. in europe, google has like a 90% market share of the search software. that's much higher even than in the united states. you're now seeing people closing their g-mail accounts in europe because they don't want their data compromised. so google is losing, yahoo is losing, people are upset. governments are upset. it's really become a mess. >> is the united states the only ones doing this? this data in europe, are europeans coming through it? >> there was a sort of embarrassing episode when french and spanish newspapers were reporting that n.s.a. was going through the data of those citizens. and then it turns out according to the n.s.a., that in fact the intelligence services in those countries were actually helping the n.s.a. do it. but this kind of defense can actually backfire in a way. because for two reasons. one, it makes intelligence sharing to the extent it does happen more difficult. because now governments, the public in those countries will be outraged to find out their governments are involved with the n.s.a. and make it harder for those intelligence services to cooperate with the n.s.a. the other thing is to the extent that the argument, the defense is everybody does it, then the chinese get off the hook because they're engaged in a lot of cyber espionage and feel that's a defense they can use. the french are engaged in a lot of industrial espionage against the americans. so, you know, there's almost no way to see where this works out well. >> tom, you mentioned the spying, the interception of data from google and yahoo. are companies like that now shutting those doors that -- or those windows or whatever the right metaphor is that the n.s.a. was using? is the n.s.a. actually losing capability across the board because of these revelations? >> well, that's interesting, doyle. because the google and yahoo saw this coming. i mean, there's been so much out there in the last few months. and they're describing it as they've been kind of in a race with the n.s.a. they have an idea where their vulnerabilities are and trying to patch them. they've been trying to encrypt the data. n.s.a. has some pretty sharp decrippings capabilities. they've gotten ahead of google and yahoo. but they're trying their best to close the vulnerabilities. but the n.s.a. was ahead of them in this case. further ahead than these companies realized. and what's going on now, i would presume that there be some negotiations behind the scenes. but those companies are embarrassed. the n.s.a. didn't want to talk about it. this is so secret we don't know. >> tom, one of the things we hear a lot about at the white house is murkiness about what the president knew about the -- i'm talking about specifically about the surveillance of other heads of state. more broadly, what do we know about what he did know about that and the administration's very eager to talk about the president's review, this review through the end of the year as if decisions are being made, being ended or repaired or fixed or adjusted, what do we know about what's going on from the white house? >> there is a review. there are two separate reviews. and there are -- competing legislation on capitol hill as well. to sort of -- much more modest than the other. it's clear that there will be changes. but there's also this blasme game going on that's opened up within the administration. this extraordinary situation this week where general keith alexander, the head of the n.s.a., basically said ambassadors are asking us to find -- to get personal information on the heads of state or the heads of government in the co
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Nov 8, 2013 12:00pm EST
>> rose: welcome to the program. tonight, a conversation with a man of many talents, james franco. >> i can't work any harder than i've been working. and i -- and i -- 1% of me does it to just be able to say to people "look, i'm not a fake. back off." the other 99% of me went to school and studied all those things because i want to take writing and directing and everything as seriously as i take acting. so i've heard that you've had interviews with a lot of people. so have you ever been asked to -- >> rose: no. >> kill anybody? >> rose: not only that, i've had no connection before i do the interview or after with any of the people. most recently assad and before that ahmadinejad. >> nobody asked you to kill assad? >> rose: no, no. >> you couldn't say if they did. maybe you already did. you poisoned him. >> rose: no. no. frank co-for the hour. next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> this is not a roast! this is my greatest, most elaborate art installation ever. (laughter) (cheers and applause) i'm not the real guest of honor, these aren't real comedians and we're not even on a real network. (laughter) what you've seen tonight was my brilliant opus to sequester and artistic visionary and subject them to the mindless incoherent trashings of a scattering of miscreated talentless abnormalities. i call it "genius unscathed." and this is my masterpiece! (cheers and applause) >> rose: james franco is here. he is an actor, a director, an artist. he's also an author. the los angeles angels of anaheim described him as -- the "los angeles times" described him as the prince of perpetual motion. his new book is called "actor anonymous" and here is the trailer for the book. >> i am the actor. >> i am the actor. >> i am the actor. >> i am the actor. >> i'm an actor so i can play anything. everyone is in me and i am in everyone. i'm part of your consciousness. >> you don't think so? you want to deny i've made my way inside? >> look, i'm here to entertain you, but i don't really care about anything, you know what i mean? >> i used to care a lot about acting. but now i see that you're only as good as your material. >> and if your material is good, you're only as good as your director. >> there's so much dependence on others that i can't care about acting anymore. >> i'm jack nicholson and marlon gran bran doe, jimmy stewart, steve mcqueen. >> i'm nicholas cage and robert pattinson, james dean and rock hudson. >> i am norma shearer and lillian gish. >> i'm garbo. >> i'm like a sophisticated prop. i give you all the feeling you want, all the hair styles and wardrobe changes you want. i'm say whatever you put in front of me. >> do not expect me to take pride in what i do. >> i used to care about how i looked. now i don't care as much. maybe it's because i'm so handsome. >> rose: i am pleased to have james franco back at this table. welcome. >> thank you. >> last time we saw each other was at brown university where you were attending rhode island school of design? >> that's great. that was a great interview. thank you. >> rose: so i just touch on this because you must get tired of talking about it. why so many things? or why not so many things? >> right. good question. um -- i admit i do a lot of things but they're all things i've been interested in as long as i've been interested in acting. basically they all -- you know, i guess -- they all fall under film, art, and literature. those are my things. they just have different forms and what i've found is that i can combine them. i can bring them together so the book is a great example where it's a book, it's a novel. at its center is acting. so i suppose why so many, the point isn't -- some people think it's an attention-getting thing or that -- >> rose: creating a brand. >> creating a brand. or trying to tackle as many things as possible and it's really not that as i think as much as being able to find the best form for the different subjects that i'm interested in. and in something like contemporary art -- i was at r.i.s.d. studying art. in that world it's fairly common and accepted for an artist to be a painter, make videos, maybe write a book. and that's because the art world has just moved beyond. they've moved beyond form, they've moved beyond the studio. it's a post-studio world and it's been that way for decades. but when an actor does it there's skepticism. rightly so. because actors generally speak or at least when you do a certain level of movie-- have a certain level of celebrity and so people are skeptical of act using their celebrity to, you know, gain in roads to areas that they otherwise wouldn't have access to. so i understand all of that. but i also have done as much work and gone to as much school as, you know, anyone else. so there's nothing i can -- i can't work any harder than i've been working. 1% of it does it to say to people "look, i'm not a fake, back off." the other 99% of me went to school and studied those things because i want to take writing and directing and everything as seriously as i take acting. >> rose: do you get a pass because you're james franco, meaning that they give you a break? you don't have to be as good as people who have devoted their life to it? >> i think it goes both ways. i think -- and then there are some forums that are more accepted paths for an actor to taken that others so now it's generally more -- you know, people are okay with the actors becoming directors ben affleck won an oscar for best picture and eastwood and kevin costner, it's -- it's -- redford. i mean, anyone, almost anyone from the '70s that was an actor, nicholson, de niro, beatty, they've all directed and most of them directed some very good movies. when an actor writes a book-- not a memoir but a book of fiction, i would say the fives are out. before i have anyone -- before anyone has read it the guns are already out. so i wrote a book of short stories called palo alto. >> rose: about where you grew up? >> it takes place in my hometown palo alto, california, about the time i was a teenager and it's about teenagers but it's a book of fiction, again. it's not a memoir. it was fairly well accepted. i got decent reviews but there was still -- what i was doing at the time when that first book came out about three or four years ago was trying -- i thought i need to keep my two worlds separate. i'm not going to write about acting and and i want people to view me as a writer. then i thought i have all this experience in the film world, almost 20 years of professional work. other writers use what they know journalists who travel the world and have some crazy experience will write a book about that. they won't say "i'm going to write a book about that." >> rose: david ignatius is a perfect example. he writes about foreign affairs in the "washington post." he's also a very good novelist and writes books made into movie and there you go. >> and i'm sure they're about foreign affairs. >> rose: right. he writes about what he knows, spice and iran and all of that. >> john grisham is going to write about lawyers. >> rose: exactly right. so you're going to write about what you know. do you fear failure or not? in other words, risk taking is part of who is in -- it's part of you. it's in your d.n.a. >> i need to do that. i realized fear of embarrassment can be extremely stifling and if i think back to when i was a teenager i loved movies and i loved plays. i would gol to san francisco and see plays butpy never engageed with acting. i never really tried it and i think that was just fear of embarrassment and then on the stage a fear of public embarrassment. and once i became an actor you get over shyness and everything because you have to talk to a lot of people, this kind of thing. but then the second step was, all right, if i'm going to i was writing and doing art long before i started doing it publicly. but i knew if i'm going put this book out or if i'm going do whatever. i'm going to have to face potential criticism or skepticism or whatever. so if this is what i want to do this is the price i have to pay and it kind of got me over that so now if the only thing that's holding me sbak the potential for failure and embarrassment i do it i never want that to hold me back. >> rose: it's one thing to write a book. but it's quite another thing to go to yale and say "i want to be in your graduate program because their standards are different. it's not just write a novel and see if anybody buys it. here's a case where you have to meet high standards. you have to get admitted and then you have to stay up with i assume a certain program otherwise their reputation is damaged. >> i'm sure some people still argue that oh, do we wÑt james franco associated with yale? and et cetera. but i could buy that maybe if it was the undergraduate program. ph.d. programs are different. they're paying me to go to school. so that's a big commitment from them. and it is a lot of work. so, you know -- for know kind of keep up with. so that was also something i had to be very clear with myself that i wanted to do it. fortunately i'm past the course work phase. there's two years of courses. >> rose: now you're writing a december pen sags or -- >> before i do that i have to take my oral exams. so in the english department you have to read 30 books in five subjects. so that's 150 books and then five professors will sit around and ask me questions about those 150 books. so i'm in the middle of that. i read almost a book a day and so i have my exam in january. >> rose: how do you have time for acting and directing? >> well, there are -- there is a lot of down time on sets. and i read almost a book a day. i have to. >> rose: do you speed read or do you just know how to read? >> i move pretty fast and i listen to audio books and i put it on the double-speed saiding so i read them twice as fast. i listen to them twice as fast. so gary sinise is reading steinbeck's "travels with charlie" so it sounds like (speaks very fast.) (laughs) >> rose: and you get the same understanding from that or even better? >> >> i would say the enjoyment factor goes down a little bit but i have to read all these books for an f the exam so i do what i have to. >> rose: finally there's this. you are, in fact, doing all these kinds of things while it's broadening you as a human being perhaps if you focused on one you'd be off the charts as an actor. and you say? >> what i say to that is -- i have a lot of answers to that. i believe in hard work. i believe in honing something. this is a book so -- that i've worked on for years. probably i wrote the first material that's in that book probably four or five years ago. >> rose: when we talked to brown some of the things i see in this book i heard from you. >> i was writing short stories when i was at columbia and my editor was actually a teacher of mine at columbia. so this is a work that's been -- i don't just put it down and throw it out there. but i also feel that there -- there's only so much polishing to be done and then it becomes less productive. there's actually a great documentary about the making of "south park," strangely enough. which i think is actually a really cool show. it's called "six days to air." so they have six days for every show they make. six days -- within that they write the episode then they animate it, then put the voices to it. six days. and one of the great things that i think trey parker says in there is "if i had more time -- we've honed it down to six days. we used to take longer but if i spent more time it would probably get a few percentage points better but not that -- not so much that it would actually pay off." so i just feel like get it together and it will have -- the playoff is that it will have a certain amount of energy to it. it might be messier but it will have vitality. and that's how i feel about certain things that i can only hone it so much and then i'll start working the energy out of it. the vitality out of it. >> rose: this is what karina long worth of "slate" says. "this 285 page book has been branded as a novel-- somewhat misleadingly. a.a.-- or actors anonymous-- is more like a published notebook full of sketches on themes rendered in a variety of different styles, sort of like a greatest hits of what one might be left with at the end of a few years of a lot of creative writing workshops. >> (laughs) >> do you agree with that? does that resonate with you? >> i think the -- i feel like that's a fairly common kind of criticism like, oh this is something out of m.f.a. programs. like -- i hear that not only about myself, i hear it about everything! >> rose: m.f.a. is master of fine arts. >> if this is something out of an m.f.a. program so is that criticism. i've heard that about people so many times. like get a new line. so i feel like that is exactly what i was trying to do, get -- put different kinds of points of view or different approaches to a single or -- a collective of themes together togethering so that it would feel sort of like it does to be an actor in hollywood. you are viewed through many different lenses. you're viewed and read through your film roles, you're viewed through legitimate journalists whop ask good questions. you're viewed through gossip magazines and the dirt of your life is brought up. people gossip about you on social networking. all of these things are -- you're viewed through all of these lenses so i wanted to capture that. it's supposed to be a collage. >> rose: one of the things you do-- which is make fun of all of this-- you did i thing on instagram which is a photo taken of you kissing another guy because of that little blip of conversations about whether you were gay or not. >> yeah, yeah. >> rose: and that was, what, to take a bemused look at how crazy celebrity was? >> no, i think what i'm trying to do there is use the aesthetic of gossip blogs to make a piece of art. so one of the things that i try and do that i can do because of my position is push different forms of art or creativity through channel -- through other kind of public channels. so for example, if this sounds pretentious, i'm sorry but it's what i do. i went on to "general hospital" and i played a role of this artist/murderer named franco. >> rose: (laughs) now that was already kind of interesting because it became -- i think it was a performance art piece and when i went to shh -- a lot of artists i knew at the time said what you're doing is great i wish i had that public forum for my stuff. but i wanted more ownership over that piece so i brought it to the museum of contemporary art in los angeles and we shot a special episode of "general hospital" at the museum of contemporary art and then it was both an episode "general hospital" aired on abc and then i also made a kind of weird arty documentary that we took to festivals and now have sold to comedy central. so there you see like performance art going through a soap opera then going through museum of contemporary art then going through national networks and then going through -- finally ending up in the frame of a weird documentary. and part of the art sr. the framing and the reframing. so when i go on stain gram and do something that is basically what these gossip blogs are doing but i'm doing it, i'm controlling it but it looks no different than the stupid photos they take of me or try and take of me i'm taking some ownership over it and they reprint it on their stupid blogs and then -- >> rose: they reprint it simply because it's you. >> they reprint it because it's me. i don't read the blogs anymore so i don't know what they said about it but just the fact that they had it on their page i then have my assistants go and take a screen shot of my photo framed by their page and then i will blow that up and i will make a painting out of that. so that's the next step of that project. >> rose: a little bit about this. you say "in defense of myself, this is a piece of fiction. i know my stories might sound like an autobiography and i'm not making much of an effort to hide when i call my arker the the actor but isn't fiction writing about what i know?" so you're writing what you know about? >> it's what we're talking about earlier. i have a professor at yale, michael warner, he's a specialist in american literature around -- like between revolution and the civil war. and he said -- but he's also a highly regarded year theorist. his first book is called letters of the republic. i think it was his thesis when he was a ph.d. and it had no year theory in it. and he said "when i realized that i could put my two worlds together i generated so much energy. that's when i became michael warner. that's when i became who i am. something fairly unique." so what happened with my first book -- i'm very happy with the first book, but i was spending a lot of energy keeping out this other part of my life and so i thought i'll put them both together and i i think a lot of energy will be generated from it. and i know that people will, you know, use this material and pull lines from it and use them against me or read them as non-non-fiction but that was the case in my other book. so whether i write about acting or not people are going to pull lines from it and say that that's me or that's the real me. but this is pointedly not a memoir. this is not a confession, it's just using what i know to create an atmosphere, to create characters. but it's not -- it's not autobiography. >> rose: a lot of people have appeared throughout it. daniel day-lewis, tash tino, chaplain, river phoenix. that's good company. is there a common denominator there? >> yeah, they were all like -- >> rose: it is who they are that's a common denominator? >> well, they're all actors. they're all incredible actors. >> rose: these were beyond actors. if you think about nicholson and brando and chaplain, they went beyond simply being actors. >> you're exactly right. so what i guess i'm trying to do is a way of using not only the fact they're acting but everything that they stand for as forms. as generators of power and meaning that you can just say chaplain and it already resonates a lot of different things. daniel day-louis stands for discipline, character, disappearing into the roles and you get this amalgamation of all the roles he's played already. when you say the name all the roles kind of flow through your head already so if i put them the book, a lot of work is already done just by saying that name. and i like that. i like being able to evoke some of their power just by saying their name. >> rose: let's talk about directing. you think directing is ar a more interesting form for you than acting? it's control, it's collaborative? >> yes, you're right. >> rose: well, you've said it. i'm simply saying what you've said. >> that's not to say that i don't still get a lot out of acting. but what i've found-- and here's one of the things that comes from doing multiple things is variety allows me to do the individual things better because when i was only acting professionally i found that i was trying to control movies that i was acting in. i was trying to do more than my job description. because i had this urge to direct. but i was the actor. and so i had to come to an understanding that movies are directors! i believe that movies work best when they are considering a director's -- when the director is overseeing
WETA
Nov 1, 2013 6:30pm EDT
marathon. >>> a gunman shot and killed a tsa worker inside a terminal at los angeles international airport this morning. that delayed flights in and out of lax for hours. the shooter, a 23-year-old from new jersey was taken into custody. several others injured. >>> that deadly shooting at lax comes just two days before the new york city marathon. security was already high in the wake of terrorist attack at the boston marathon earlier this year. mary thompson looks bekind the scenes of the largest marathon and what it means for the new york economy. >> reporter: when runners go through the starting line of the new york city marathon, they do so as the shadow of the boston marathon. >> nypd began examining and enhancing the coverage of the race starting until the day after the boston marathon. >> the club is spending over a million dollars on security this year, more than double spent on the last marathon. on race day, spectators backpacks will be subject to search, hundreds of mobile cameras around the city will be monitored by security, 48,000 runners will be scened at the start an
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Nov 7, 2013 6:30pm EST
shapel. it gets toll access to wealthy high growth markets such as metro los angeles, orange county and the bay area of san francisco. shares up to $32.68. >>> qualcomm, increasing competition overseas caused the leading mobile ship maker to post earnings short of the estimates. the company gave a weak outlook for the current period. the stock tumbled 4% to finish at $67.09. temper sealy was a big stock. the third quarter results comfortably beat wall street boosted by a bounce back in north american sales. the stock jumped 12%. >>> more bad news drove down tesla. the model s electric car caught fire today for the third time in six weeks. no injuries in any of the fires unless you count the injuries suffered by tesla's once high-flying stock. it fell for the third day in a row after ricing by more than 400% earlier in the year. but now in audition to fierps, there are concerns about a battery shortage as well as the cost. tesla will build more cars and become lately a favorite among short sellers who believe the stock is still over valued. shares continue to fall since the earnings
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Nov 14, 2013 12:00am EST
tavis: good evening evening from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with oliver stone. the writer and director of some of the most successful movies in recent memory. his recent film "jfk" was the in 1998.y released it is now in re release on blu- ray and in select movie theaters. we are glad you joined us for a conversation with oliver stone coming up right now. ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: oscar-winning writer, producer and director oliver stone has never shied away from controversy from his screenplay for "midnight express" which won him the first of his three boards. he tackles one of the most controversial stories in america. "jfk was quote has been re- released on blu-ray and in select theaters. realized kennedy was so dangerous to the establishment. is that why? >> that is a real question, isn't it? why? the how and the who is just scenery for the public. -- it keeps, cuba asking theng from most important question. why was kennedy killed? who benefited? who has the power to cover it up? tav
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Nov 12, 2013 12:00am EST
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. and, a conversation with edward james olmos and lisagay hamilton about their new movie "go for sisters," with independent director, john sayles, dealing with a mother's search for her son across california's border with mexico. we are glad you could join us for our conversation with edward james olmos and lisagay hamilton coming up right now. ♪ by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. ♪ films thatpendent deal with complex human interaction can often get lost in the push for big-budget movies around here, and one film that i hope does not get lost in the mix is from to time oscar nominated director, john sayles starring edward james olmos and lisagay hamilton about a mother's search for her son in tijuana. and we start with a clip from "go for sisters." >> so? >> i want him back, and if there is anyway, i do not want him to go to jail. juan.s you must still have friends on the local fours. >> no. that is a federal staying. the voice is on the tapes. taking money. you have to be careful who
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Nov 8, 2013 12:00am EST
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with actress nia long about a career that will stand the test of time. she is starring in a sequel called "the best man holiday." a group of friends reunite after years of being separated. we are glad you have joined us. coming up, right now. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: nia long was one of the reasons the best man was a huge hit in 1999. working years later, the sequel is finally here. it reunites all the actors from the first film. timehis sequel, the long- friends a strange for nearly 15 years come together for a long holiday weekend where they discover how easy it is for rivalries and romances to be reignited. ooh. take a look at the clip from "best man holiday." >> i have to do they'll on dinner tonight. lex i get it. you could have called or e- mailed. it you could have sent the text. >> the damnedest thing. and none of my devices were working so i figured i should deliver the messages myself. i changed my flight so i can come to you -- com
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Nov 1, 2013 8:30pm EDT
los angeles where they'd did better than the dodgers. they hired these overachieving journeymen players. they they did not buy with an open checkbook. on the field they played well and they were the best team in baseball. as strange as it might seem. >> there is a lesson here in politics. you hire guys who will do the job or you. you do not want any prima donnas. >> my team was the nationals and i kind of rooted for detroit has they had a rough time but i was taken by the un-alloyed joy in boston. that made me smile just to see that. >> it was a nice touch when they went over to the finish line where the bombing took place. >> it definitely was. senator john kerry i believe is the person who first said this. the first time it is about the curse, second time it is proving you are supposed to be there and the third time is just pure joy. >> they have a feel-good story and sports based on old- fashioned grit and people playing together and no prima donnas. that is so out of the norm it is a
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Nov 2, 2013 6:30pm EDT
. gwen: covering the week, tom gjelten of n.p.r. doyle mcmanus of the "los angeles times." alexis simendinger of realclearpolitics. and karen tumulty of "the washington post." >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens, live from our nation's capital this is "washington week with gwen ifill." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we went out and asked people a simple question -- how old is the oldest person you've known? we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us have known someone who's lived well into their 90's. and that's a great thing. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn't changed, the official retirement age. the question is, how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years? >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by northrop grumman. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to pbs stations from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from
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Nov 2, 2013 12:00am EDT
three legendary home runs on three pitches to seal victory for the new york yankees over the los angeles dodgers in game six of the 1977 world series. the hall of famer won five world series anxious, two with the yankees, he writes amount that much more in "becoming mr. october". i am pleased to have reggie jackson back at this table. welcome. >> thank you. >> rose: let's do a picture of you. this is the first line. first chapter, chapter run, i never intended to play professional baseball. after high school, i had gone down to arizona state on a football scholarship playing for frank curb, who was a great coach and knew my high school football coach from the pittsburgh area and he had said that i would be a great college player. and look at this. there is a picture of you as a football player. do you regret that you didn't play football at all? >> no. no. i would say not. i certainly enjoyed football, and i had the kind of pent up aggression, if you will, to where football was something that i enjoyed. i enjoyed the collisions and the physical contact. >> rose: okay. so let me a
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Nov 5, 2013 7:00pm EST
airport prices in san francisco, san jose and los angeles which have passed similar living wage laws; winners like airport companies owned by shareholders who've also been flying high for years. seatac handled a record 33 million passengers last year who spent $180 million at places like anthony's, the top grossing airport restaurant in north america. alaska airlines, headquartered in seatac, just reported record third-quarter income. and yet, in 2005, living wage advocates declaim alaska airlines terminated 500 unionized ramp workers here, rehired some as lower-paid nonunion contractors. moreover, many airport workers get no sick leave. none. roxan seibel's been working at seatac for 30 years, has two adopted daughters, considers herself lucky to be making $13.95 an hour. >> i've been sick enough over the years where i've thrown up in the garbage cans. and if i call in sick, i get a point, which is a demerit against me. >> reporter: enough demerits and she loses her job. >> i had pneumonia once that took me over three months to get over, and i was sick and i was going to work every
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Nov 6, 2013 7:00pm EST
with mayor daly. we've seen this early in the year in los angeles. i mean, this is sort of like an opportunity to see some fresh faces in some of the largest cities in america where we've had the exact same people in charge for a very long time. >> ifill: i think tom menino is 24 years older than the guy replacing him. i want to go back to detroit. that's the one that is not like the other two. it is a city under stress, quite dysfunctional and on the brink of bankruptcy. >> and i think what happened in detroit is they basically hired a problem solver, someone with deep roots in the corporate, civic, and medical community, and that's how detroit is going to come back. it's going to come back from these anchor institutions. you already see it in the downtown, along the woodward corridor, and the midtown. they really elected someone who seems like he's got the experience and the expertise to grow jobs, give people access to opportunity, in an otherwise fiscally challenged, very dysfunctional class. >> ifill: a majority of blacks elects the first white mayor in 40 years, and that's be
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Nov 1, 2013 12:00pm EDT
new york. and friday november 1st? los angeles. and then will expand from there. thank you. thank you for joining us. see you next time. captioning sponsored by rose communications captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
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